Parsha Q&A - Parshas Vayikra

Library Library Library

Parsha Q&A

Parshas Vayikra

For the week ending 3 Nissan 5759 / 19 & 20 March 1999

Contents:
  • Parsha Questions
  • Sherlox Holmes
  • I Did Not Know That!
  • Recommended Reading List
  • Answers to Parsha Questions
  • Solution to Sherlox Holmes
  • Back issues of Parsha Q&A
  • Subscription Information
  • Ohr Somayach Home Page

  • This publication is also available in the following formats: [Text] [Word] [PDF] Explanation of these symbols 

    Parsha Questions

    Answers | Contents

    1. Who does the word "eilav" in verse 1:1 exclude?
    2. Name all the types of animals and birds mentioned in this week's Parsha.
    3. What two types of sin does an olah atone for?
    4. Where was the olah slaughtered?
    5. What procedure of an animal-offering can a non-kohen perform?
    6. Besides the fire the kohanim bring on the altar, where else did the fire come from?
    7. At what stage of development are torim (turtledoves) and bnei yona (young pigeons) unfit as offerings?
    8. What is melika?
    9. Why are animal innards offered on the altar, while bird innards are not?
    10. Why does the Torah describe both the animal and bird offerings as a "satisfying aroma"?
    11. Why is the term "nefesh" used regarding the flour offering?
    12. Which part of the free-will minchah offering is burned on the altar?
    13. The Torah forbids bringing honey with the minchah. What is meant by "honey"?
    14. When does the Torah permit bringing a leavened bread offering?
    15. Concerning shlamim, why does the Torah teach about sheep and goats separately?
    16. For most offerings the kohen may use a service vessel to apply the blood on the mizbe'ach. For which korban may he apply the blood using only his finger?
    17. Who is obligated to bring a chatas?
    18. Where were the remains of the bull burnt while in the wilderness? Where were they burnt during the Beis Hamikdash times?
    19. What two things does a voluntary minchah have that a minchas chatas lacks?
    20. What is the minimum value of a korban asham?


     
    Solution 
    Contents

    Sherlox Holmes and the Mysterious Fire

    World famous detextive Sherlox Holmes gave three short puffs on his meerschaum pipe. "You haven't got a match, have you Dr. Watstein?" he said.

    "I'm afraid I do," said Watstein, peering into the large volume that lay before him. "This text is my match. But I'm no match for it."

    "Read it to me," said Sherlox.

    "The verse says 'the sons of Aharon the kohen shall put fire (v'nasnu aish) on the altar...' (Vayikra 1:7). Rashi points out that even though miraculous fire from Heaven kindled the altar, the kohanim were nevertheless commanded to do their part and bring some 'man-made' fire too."

    "G-d helps those who help themselves," said Sherlox.

    "True, but why does Rashi need to go into this whole explanation? The verse is as simple as can be: 'The kohanim should put fire on the altar.' What 'sparks' Rashi to mention fire from Heaven?"

    "Dr. Watstein," said Sherlox, "you haven't got a match."


    I Did Not Know That!

    "If the anointed kohen sins…he shall offer a bull as a sin offering…And take the bull outside the camp…and burn it…" (Leviticus 4:3,12)

    The Torah commands that the kohen gadol's sin offering be burned in public, outside the Sanctuary premises, so that no one will be embarrassed to admit his own sin. "Imagine!" a sinner will think, "Even the kohen gadol sinned; yet he admitted it and brought an atonement offering. Certainly, I too should admit my sin and bring an atonement."

    (Ba'al Haturim)


    Recommended Reading List

    Ramban
    1:9
    Reason for Korbanos
    1:10
    Bulls and Goats
    1:14
    Birds
    2:2
    Role of the Kohen
    2:11
    The Problem of Leaven
    2:14
    Why "If"
    Sefer Hachinuch
    95
    Concept of Korbanos
    117
    Symbolism of Leaven and Honey
    119
    Salt
    123
    Korban Oleh V'yored
    125
    A Sinner's Offering
    127
    The Sin of Carelessness


    Answers to this Week's Questions

    All references are to the verses and Rashi's commentary, unless otherwise stated

    1. Who does the word "eilav" in verse 1:1 exclude?
      1:1 - Aharon.

    2. Name all the types of animals and birds mentioned in this week's Parsha.
      1:2,14, 3:12 - Cattle, sheep, goats, turtledoves (torim), and doves (bnei yona).

    3. What two types of sin does an olah atone for?
      1:4 - Neglecting a positive command, and violating a negative command which is rectified by a positive command.

    4. Where was the olah slaughtered?
      1:5 - In the Mishkan Courtyard (azarah).

    5. What procedure of an animal-offering can a non-kohen perform?
      1:5 - Ritual slaughter.

    6. Besides the fire the kohanim bring on the altar, where else did the fire come from?
      1:7 - It descended from Heaven.

    7. At what stage of development are torim (turtledoves) and bnei yona (young pigeons) unfit as offerings?
      1:14 - When their plumage turns golden. At that stage, bnei yona are too old and torim are too young.

    8. What is melika?
      1:15 - Slaughtering a bird from the back of the neck using one's fingernail.

    9. Why are animal innards offered on the altar, while bird innards are not?
      1:16 - An animal's food is provided by its owner, so its innards are "kosher." Birds, however, eat food that they scavenge, so their innards are tainted with "theft."

    10. Why does the Torah describe both the animal and bird offerings as a "satisfying aroma"?
      1:17 - To indicate that the size of the offering is irrelevant, provided your heart is directed toward G-d.

    11. Why is the term "nefesh" used regarding the flour offering?
      2:1 - Usually, it is a poor person who brings a flour offering. Therefore, Hashem regards it as if he had offered his nefesh (soul).

    12. Which part of the free-will minchah offering is burned on the altar?
      2:1 - The kometz (fistful).

    13. The Torah forbids bringing honey with the minchah. What is meant by "honey"?
      2:11 - Any sweet fruit derivative.

    14. When does the Torah permit bringing a leavened bread offering?
      2:12 - On Shavuos.

    15. Concerning shlamim, why does the Torah teach about sheep and goats separately?
      3:7 - Because they differ regarding the alya (fat tail). The lamb's alya is burned on the altar but the goat's is not.

    16. For most offerings the kohen may use a service vessel to apply the blood on the mizbe'ach. For which korban may he apply the blood using only his finger?
      3:8 - The chatas.

    17. Who is obligated to bring a chatas?
      4:2 - One who accidentally transgresses a negative commandment whose willing violation carries the kares (excision) penalty.

    18. Where were the remains of the bull burnt while in the wilderness? Where were they burnt during the Beis Hamikdash times?
      4:12 - a) Outside the three camps. b) Outside Jerusalem.

    19. What two things does a voluntary minchah have that a minchas chatas lacks?
      5:11 - Levona and oil.

    20. What is the minimum value of a korban asham?
      5:15 - Two shekalim.



    Mystery
    Contents

    Solution to Sherlox Holmes

    "Dr. Watstein, what does one generally do with fire?" asked Sherlox.

    "You kindle it, what else?" said Watstein.

    "And what does this verse say, literally?"

    "It says v'nasnu aish, they put fire! Aha! I see! The word v'nasnu - they put - doesn't really match the word aish - fire. You don't put fire, you kindle fire."

    "Exactly," said Sherlox. "The Torah almost always uses the phrase to kindle a fire, not to put a fire. Like in the verse: The kohen will kindle wood upon it." (Vayikra 6:5)

    "Yes," said Watstein, "and like the verse: Do not kindle a fire on the Shabbos day. (Shemos 35:3) Therefore, Rashi wants to explain why here it says to put fire. Rashi answers with the midrashic explanation that the kohen did not initiate the kindling of the fire, for it was already alight from Heaven. Rather, he merely put fire, adding his share to the existing blaze."

    "Dr. Watstein, you haven't got a match!"

    (Based on Maskil L'David; Sherlox" is by Reuven Subar
    inspired by Dr. Avigdor Bonchek's "What's Bothering Rashi")

    Written and Compiled by Rabbi Eliyahu Kane & Rabbi Reuven Subar
    General Editor: Rabbi Moshe Newman
    Production Design: Eli Ballon
    © 1999 Ohr Somayach International - All rights reserved. This publication may be distributed to another person intact without prior permission. We also encourage you to include this material in other publications, such as synagogue newsletters. However, we ask that you contact us beforehand for permission, and then send us a sample issue.

    This publication is available via E-Mail
    Ohr Somayach Institutions is an international network of Yeshivot and outreach centers, with branches in North America, Europe, South Africa and South America. The Central Campus in Jerusalem provides a full range of educational services for over 685 full-time students.

    The Jewish Learning Exchange (JLE) of Ohr Somayach offers summer and winter programs in Israel that attract hundreds of university students from around the world for 3 to 8 weeks of study and touring.

    The Ohr Somayach Home Page is hosted by TeamGenesis
    vj_bar.gif (1798 bytes)

    Copyright © 1999 Ohr Somayach International. Send us Feedback.
    Dedication opportunities are available for Parsha Q&A. Please contact us for details.
    Ohr Somayach International is a 501c3 not-for-profit corporation (letter on file) EIN 13-3503155 and your donation is tax deductable.